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Burkini creator criticises ban

“I wanted to give power back to them" – The Australian creator of the burkini has slammed former French President Nicolas Sarkozy for calling the full-body swimsuit a “provocation”. http://bit.ly/2bXPmYT

Posted by SBS News on Thursday, 25 August 2016

SBS interviewed Aheda Zanetti, inventor of the Burkini, the controversial full-body swimsuit that has ignited debate in France. “I wanted to give power back to them” – The Australian creator of the burkini has slammed former French President Nicolas Sarkozy for calling the full-body swimsuit a “provocation”. “My symbol is freedom, flexibility and confidence. I am into women’s rights. A lot of other women are bringing,endorsing and using  this for whatever reason. So this wearer, is now not a Muslim anymore. She could be an atheist, cancer survivor, allergic to sunscreen. It doesn’t matter why. So you should not judge this swimsuit on one race. Once again, these Muslim women are being punished. I wanted to give power back to them, I wanted them to be more confident.”

Kbora Ali

Kbora Ali came to Australia, aged 9, speaking no English. She graduated high school top of her grade. Then she joined the Australian Army – the first female Afghan refugee to do so.

Posted by SBS News on Tuesday, 16 August 2016

Kbora Ali came to Australia, aged 9, speaking no English. She graduated high school top of her grade. Then she joined the Australian Army – the first female Afghan refugee to do so.

“I was scared my parents, ‘ accept my decision. I was the youngest child, the only daughter, who made a very different decision to all my sisters. They’re going to uni, I’m following a new pathway that was very new in our family especially. It was hard for my dad to accept the fact that I was joining the Defence and becoming a soldier. I wanted to get out, I knew that there was something bigger that now serves a greater purpose in my life.”

A dux of her school, with marks that could send her to Australia’s most elite universities, Afghan-born refugee Kbora Ali instead made a ground-breaking decision: she joined the Army.

Kbora Ali’s most vivid memories are of Pakistan, and then suburban Adelaide where she has lived since she was nine.

In the last two years, she’s left the security of her family home and travelled east, to pursue a career some have worried does not befit an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) of 97.5.