Author: Zaynab Gul

A Henna Artist’s Journey

HennaDot.com recently interviewed Sydney based henna artist on her journey of the craft. 1. Tell us a little about yourself (Where you live? Your henna journey? How you decided to pursue this form of art)?  My name is Nafeesah and I’m currently living in Sydney. I’m originally from Mauritius, a treasure in the Indian Ocean. I have been doing henna for as long as I can remember which could be around the age of 8-9. Born and raised in Mauritius, it was not hard to discover the art of henna, given that the little island thrives on multiculturalism. There’s henna for every festival, be it Eid, or Divali, or weddings. Occasionally, for weddings and Eids, I used to get adorned by my elder cousins and I remember how I would admire and get absorbed just watching them do the art on themselves, on my hands and on others. Back in the days, henna was mostly dots and patches here and there but my cousins were really good at it. Their designs, always so fine, would stand out to me. When everybody had their henna done, I’d often pick up the used cones – usually there’s still plenty left in them – and start drawing on my arm, wherever there was no henna drawn already. That’s how my passion grew and that’s when I knew it was something I was going to...

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Not Your Middle Eastern Islam

Islam isn’t a country. Its rules and teachings aren’t just what goes on in the Middle East. As the world found out two weeks ago, Saudi Arabia will be one of the last countries to finally legalise a woman’s right to drive as of June 2018. But, seventh century Islam elevated a woman’s status at a time when daughters were being buried alive out of spite for their gender. In 2011, women’s rights activist Manal Al-Sharif was jailed by the Saudi government simply for posting a YouTube video of her driving a car. It’s a funny version of Islam...

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Fundraising Dinner for Hills District Mosque

A multiethnic Muslim group are holding a fundraising dinner on Sunday 8 October to raise funds to build a Mosque in the Sydney Hills District to provide for the growing Islamic community in the area, a project that has been in the making. The Hills District Muslim Society (HDMS) have only now been able to secure a five-acre site, perfect for the many purposes that the community would like to utilise the property for. The 2016 census recorded approximately twelve thousand Muslims in the Hills District, otherwise known as the ‘Bible Belt’ because of the abundance of churches in the area. Member and leader of the HDMS Hamed Baqaie spoke about the importance of having a fixed area for worship rather than having to move to and from multiple temporary locations. “Finally, we can call a place home. We don’t have to pack and unpack for our prayers and events anymore. During Ramadan, we had to furnish the halls for Taraweeh every night and pack it up after each prayer. For Jumuah, we are still doing the same. Anytime the council can stop us from praying, which will leave us without a place to pray.” When asked about the fundraising dinner, Baqaie said, “People should expect a beautiful meal in a beautiful establishment. It is the coming together of the Muslim community from different walks of life but with...

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Multilingual Doctor Helping Multicultural Communities

Multilingual doctor, Alifa Khan from Cranbourne, Victoria, is determined to using her language skills to help the elderly and migrant communities receive higher standards of medical care and services. Born in Bangladesh, Dr Khan now practices at Unique Medical Centre, a new and well equipped modern practice in the heart of Cranbourne, where she hopes to contribute to the community in every possible way. Dr Khan, who is fluent in Bengali and English and can understand Urdu and Hindi, said that knowing a language doesn’t only mean a new set of vocabularies, but rather it means understanding a different...

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Muslim Aid first to be accredited by Foreign Affairs

        Muslim Aid Australia has become the first and only Islamic charity organisation to be accredited by the Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade (DFAT) following a successful assessment of the NGO’s governance, program management capacity, policies, risk, and partner management. The accreditation process aims to provide the Department and the Australian public with confidence that the Australian Government is funding professional, well managed, community based organisations that are capable of delivering quality development outcomes. Accredited Australian NGO’s are eligible for funding under the Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP). In 2016-17 the ANCP provided $127.3 million...

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december, 2017

10nov - 24decnov 106:30 pmdec 24I don’t want to be there when it happens

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